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Monthly Nano News: December 2019 + Year Recap Special

This is what NANO has been up to lately. I don't think I lie if I say it has been quite an amazing year!
See you soon and happy new year! Something nice is coming soon that I have been working on for a while, stay tuned..

December 2019

November 2019

October 2019

September 2019

August 2019

July 2019

June 2019

May 2019

Apr 2019

Mar 2019

Feb 2019

Jan 2019


More news here: https://nanolinks.info/news

https://preview.redd.it/9sw5nkoxlt741.png?width=749&format=png&auto=webp&s=3426d4eafb9430c0304a6d161596102536df4318
submitted by Joohansson to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Top 10 of The Biggest Cryptocurrency Hacks and Scams Ever

If you have been around the cryptocurrency industry long enough, you will know that one of the biggest risks faced by users is the loss of funds through hacks on cryptocurrency wallets and exchanges.
Online exchanges are prime targets for hackers and thieves on the internet. This is mainly because of the amount of funds that are kept on these platforms. For hackers that have succeeded in stealing funds from such platforms, the amounts are usually huge.
As much as individual users try to play their roles in securing their accounts by using personal passwords, PINs and codes, there is a higher layer of security that lies in the hands of the platform providers. Once this is breached, the individual security efforts become irrelevant.
Over the years, exchanges and wallets appear to have improved in terms of security as the frequency of hacks and platform breaches have reduced. What used to be a common occurrence in the industry has become a rare development, with hacks now few and far between.
Let’s take a look at the top 10 of the biggest cryptocurrency hacks and scams ever.

10. Bitcoin Gold ($18 Million)

In May 2018, the theoretical 51% attack possibility was proven in a heist that saw a breach in Bitcoin Gold which cost the protocol $18 million.
In this heist, hackers used 51% raw computing power to seize control of the network and carry out their ulterior plans effectively. Ciphertrace and other security outfits in the ecosystem believe that the algorithm weaknesses in Bitcoin Gold’s Proof of Work (PoW) transaction verification may have enabled the success of the theft.

9. Geth ($20 Million)

In June 2018, the Ethereum client Geth was hacked and ETH worth $20 million was stolen. This incidence was reported by blockchain security firm, Cyphertrace. During the hack, JSON-RPC port 8545 was exploited. This is the port that initiates ETH send transactions.
All the ETH wallets that were affected by this breach was drained by the thieves, accumulating to the quoted $20 million equivalence based on the price of ETH at that time.

8. Bancor ($23.5 Million)

In July 2018, about one month after the Geth incident, decentralized cryptocurrency exchange, Bancor was hacked and $23.5 million worth of crypto stolen. This particular event raised some eyebrows in the cryptocurrency industry, redefining the general opinion of decentralized exchanges being prone to hacking.
The process involved the exploitation of a security flaw in a wallet that was used to update some of the smart contracts on the exchange. Bancor, which was one of the most successful ICOs of 2017, raising $153 million during its token sale, was forced to shut down after the hack.

7. Coinrail ($40 Million)

Coinrail was hacked in June 2018, and $40 million was stolen from the exchange. The South Korean exchange which ranked among the top 100 exchanges by volume, suspended its services shortly after the hack.
According to sources from the exchange, the tokens that were stolen included NPXS tokens from the Pundi X project, ATC from Aston and the NPER project’s NPER token.
  1. Binance ($40.7 Million)
Binance exchange was hacked in May 2019 and 7,000 Bitcoins were stolen from the platform. The value of the Bitcoins stolen at the time was about $40.7 million.
To achieve their aim, hackers were able to steal API keys, two-factor codes and some other key information to access the wallets. According to the exchange, the incident impacted only about 2% of its total Bitcoin holdings as all other wallets are secure.
Affected wallets were promised a refund through the exchange’s Secure Asset Fund for Users (SAFU) arrangement. This is a policy that the exchange uses to prepare for rainy days. A portion of fees charged on the exchange is set aside in order to ensure that platform users do not bear the brunt during occurrences such as this.

5. Zaif ($60 Million)

Japan-based cryptocurrency exchange Zaif was hacked in September 2018 and $60 million was stolen in the process. The theft was possible after hackers gained authorised access into the exchanges hot wallets, making away with huge amounts of Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, and MonaCoin.
The exchange’s asset reserve could not cover the loss, therefore it reached an agreement with a Japan-listed firm called Fisco to receive a $44.5 million investment in exchange for a major share of ownership.

4. Bitfinex ($77 Million)

The Bitfinex hack of August 2016 was a popular event that rocked the entire cryptocurrency industry. The hack occurred at a time when cryptocurrencies appeared to be shifting gears in terms of awareness and development. As a matter of fact, the aftermath of the event saw the Bitcoin price drop by 20%.
After the hack, Bitfinex issued cryptographic tokens to its users that were affected by the hack, all of which the exchange announced to have bought back by April 2017.

3. BitGrail ($187 Million)

$187 million worth of Nano tokens were stolen from BitGrail in February 2018. The reported theft was announced weeks after the unauthorized transfer was initiated. This information was from evidence retrieved from the Nano blockchain explorer by skeptics.
While BitGrail recognized the concerns of it users, it however stated that it is impossible for it to refund the stolen amount.

2. Mt. Gox ($460 Million)

The Mt. Gox scandal remains one of the biggest stains on the cryptocurrency industry. In February 2014, Mt. Gox was hacked and as much as $460 million was stolen from the exchange. In the wake of this, the exchange’s CEO, Mark Karpeles issued a statement that accepted responsibility on behalf of his company.
“We had weaknesses in our system, and our bitcoins vanished. We’ve caused trouble and inconvenience to many people, and I feel deeply sorry for what has happened, “ he said.
At the time, Mt. Gox was the world’s largest Bitcoin exchange that looked impressive from the outside, but many who claimed to know about the internal workings accused the company of a messy combination of poor management, neglect, and raw inexperience.
The size of this event left a huge dent on the reputation of Bitcoin and the crypto industry at large. It took a long time before the market picked up again, and for users to regain confidence in the industry. The exchange has since gone down and ceased to exist.

1. Coincheck ($500 Million)

The biggest theft in the history of the cryptocurrency industry happened in January 2018, when Japan-based cryptocurrency exchange, Coincheck was hacked. A total of NEM tokens worth $500 million were stolen in the process.
A statement from the exchange accepted the blame and took responsibility for the breach. According to reports, rather than storing its customers’ assets in offline wallets, the assets were stored in hot wallets that were connected to the internet. Coincheck also reportedly failed to protect the wallets with standard multi-signature security protocols.
Having traced the destination of the stolen funds, NEM developers created a tracking tool that would allow exchanges to automatically reject stolen funds.

Conclusion

Hacks and massive theft of cryptocurrencies have contributed to the setback experienced by the technology. Each of the events takes a hit on the confidence of investors and willing participants who may not be sure of how the affected exchanges will handle the situation.
The industry is however learning from past experiences, as the frequency of such hacks have reduced, while in some cases, modalities are being put in place to ensure that end users do not bear the brunt of such events, just like the case of Binance.
The NEM developers’ response to the Coincheck hack has a way of rendering stolen funds unspendable, as long as other members of the community comply. However, no one knows how long this will last, and if the hackers will be able to nullify the traceability of the stolen coins yet.
The action by the developers will discourage hackers and thieves, but is yet to restore value to the end users whose funds have been stolen.
For the industry to grow as it should and become stable, security of funds need to be established. Exchanges and developers are continuously making efforts to ensure that funds and transactions within the industry remain safe at all times.
http://bitcoinadvisor.info/top-10-of-the-biggest-cryptocurrency-hacks-and-scams-eve?fbclid=IwAR1aKdbjF1HQpFQq3jH6PQptxt7mhXHJWsABPnlN5ZEjmq07ByMEYWvVezM
submitted by OliAustin101 to TopBottomCrypto [link] [comments]

Getting DigiByte listed on Binance - Progress update

There’s been a bunch of requests lately to get DigiByte listed on Binance. I’m here to confirm today that the hold-up in doing-so is not due to anything in our control.
Let me set the scene for you: We have been listed on approx 2x exchanges per week, every week, for the last few months. This has been in part due to some of the Foundation and some incredibly dedicated community members, again keeping in mind none of this is paid work. I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the many hours that these people put in, filling out forms, chasing exchanges, getting information and technical details to them.
Then, we find out there are other exchanges that we’re listed on, without our knowledge. Again, that’s fantastic, and because we are a decentralized blockchain with the source-code open and freely available on Github, this means there’s nothing preventing Exchanges from doing this. Because the DigiByte Core Wallet has it’s basis on the Bitcoin Core Wallet, if an Exchange has integrated Bitcoin or Litecoin, they have the technical know-how to integrate DigiByte, and it’s not a difficult task.
Back to Binance.
There is a form that Binance request new sign-ups complete. A pretty standard practice, basically to weed out the time-wasters and brand new ICO’s that aren’t worth anything at all. Totally cool, and so this was filled out earlier last year, and again just one day after Christmas. No problems there.
Since then, Binance have requested the completion of a NDA form. Unfortunately this NDA form is completely not applicable to DigiByte, as we are not a central company, we're not an ICO that raised funds, nor do we take any percentage of each newly minted block as other coins do.
I’m sure you’re all well aware that DigiByte relies on the donation of time of all its Foundation Members, as none of us have been given any DigiByte by anybody to survive on, and once the Foundation has been fully established then down the line decisions will be made regarding how those funds are best spent. For now though, everything is done from the generosity of the hearts of those in the Foundation and community, because we believe in this project, it’s merits, and what it stands for.
So this NDA form, we can’t in good faith sign it, as it’s not applicable to us and legally there’s no point in putting ourselves into a situation where things aren’t clear. However, it begs the question: Why is there an NDA form required at all? Anybody can list DigiByte on their own Exchange, and it doesn’t require us to be made privy to any technical or financial details about a company. They basically download the wallet, as you and I would, integrate it into their Exchange through RPC calls to the digibyted, and that’s about it. The RPC / P2P port details are all in the BitcoinTalk thread. No NDA required, and the listing can be completely done without any input / help from the DigiByte Foundation, community or developers.
It gets better though:
On the application form (Keep in mind this has been completed twice now), there are a number of things such as:
You accept that Binance reserves the right to de-list your coin at any time, for any reason, solely at Binance's discretion. * With the answer options being: - Yes, I agree. - No, no need to hit the submit button.
That’s fair, there is no problem with them de-listing DigiByte if they want, Exchanges do it all the time for coins and ICO’s that have a very small volume. DigiByte however has done a few thousand BTC daily volume just on Bittrex alone (Just using them for comparison). Even with the admirable 0.1% fees that Binance charges, that’s still a few BTC every single day in trading-fees alone, which makes it seem like DigiByte would be a worthwhile investment for them to add on their own accord.
So the problem with us accepting donations from the community as an attempt to pay a listing fee to get on to Binance, they could still de-list DigiByte at any time for no good reason, we have to agree to that before they’ll actually accept the submission. On top of this even if we do pay the “Listing fee”, DigiBytes acceptance on to the Exchange is not guaranteed. We would have no come-back for that, no repercussions, nothing that we can do to prevent it. The CEO even states in his “Tips for getting listed”:
High fee does not guarantee listing, but it may increase your review priority. If you don't want to pay a listing fee, simply put 0. Free market will determine the rest.
It gets better,
On top of the NDA requirement, there is no TOS or similar at Binance. While in my eyes this doesn’t prevent DigiByte from being listed (DigiByte is on a few Exchanges without terms of service thanks to their own initiative), it does mean that this isn’t an ideal scenario. Why is this not an ideal scenario? Because there is no legal recourse for any of the users, no obligation to help them, and if they were to take the “Listing fee”, they can literally just take it and run.
I don’t think it would be very responsible of the DigiByte Foundation to arrange crowd-sourcing the funding, for a venture such as this, where there are absolutely no guarantees at all.
While we admire the enthusiasm of the community and your willingness to assist, the last thing we want is for it to all be for nothing. If the community is really keen on donating to a project, we would recommend donating to the recent development that has been undertaken on the iOS wallet, headed up by a community members company. This will be a big step forwards for DigiByte and fills a gaping hole in our arsenal (See: https://github.com/Racecraft/digibytewallet-ios for donation link at the bottom of the page)
In the mean time, we are still pursuing avenues to get us listed, while maintaining true to our honor and integrity, and doing all that we can to look out for the community.
Besides, Binance would make more than this within a few days worth of listing us, based on trading-fees alone, so the "requirement" of a listing fee just does not make sense.
Edit: Made a poor attempt at fixing the formatting coz apparently I still suck at the markup required here to make it look pretty
submitted by Chilling_Silence to Digibyte [link] [comments]

Plataforma de Futuros da Binance Passo a Passo -Como Operar Contratos Futuros de Bitcoin na Binance. Binance's CZ: #572 Binance vor dem Kollaps, Thailand ICO Portal & Wachstum von Bitcoin schlecht für Banken Binance Acquires CoinMarketCap for $400 million! Crypto World Rocked! Christian Miccoli: da CEO di BANCHE a BITCOIN. Vi porto da CONIO! Binance Reveals Visa Debit Card in Push to Bring Bitcoin (BTC) and Crypto Payments Worldwide Binance Expands Fiat Onramps, 15 New Currencies Now ...

To configure your RPC wallet you can either use command line options or config file. But config file is flexible and you’ll have more control. Also it is required for staking and solo mining purpose so let’s see how to create a config file for your wallet. Create a new text document. Next open it and go to File >> Save as. P2P port: 15714, RPC port: 15715; In order to make the mining process open for each user, the computing power required by the computers was defined to a minimum. Furthermore, the limited number of coins ensures value stability. According to the developers, the currency can grow by 739,125 coins annually. Common operations Listing my bitcoin addresses. Listing the bitcoin addresses in your wallet is easily done via listreceivedbyaddress.It normally lists only addresses which already have received transactions, however you can list all the addresses by setting the first argument to 0, and the second one to true. Totally forget about Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, Monero, Zcash and all other popular Cryptocurrencies. Apply this solo mining guide only on coins in which you could expect results. The most suitable ones are the newly launched Altcoins where the network difficulty will be too low. There are tons of new coins that you can choose from if you head over to P2P Port: 18030; RPC Port: 18031; Open Source. You can review, comment and propose updates. Anonymous . Your messages & transactions are completely private. Decentralized. Uses a Peer to Peer network. Safety. First class security, advanced encryption. World Wide. Message and transact with users around the globe. Fast. Your payments/transactions are processed instantly. HushDEX (Decentralized ... All mining software will work with it: just point the mining software at bitcoind's RPC port and use the appropriate RPC username/password. bitcoind doesn't know how to do payouts or multi-user authentication, though, so public mining pools require additional software. share improve this answer follow answered Jun 4 '12 at 1:54. theymos theymos. 8,296 33 33 silver badges 33 33 bronze ... PayMail is an identity and service discovery protocol that removes the need to use plain Bitcoin addresses and smooths the path for peers to connect to each other in the Bitcoin space. It uses human-readable names that can be used in exactly the same way as an email addresses to automatically negotiate transactions. Docs . Our plan is to process the 4.5 billion plus prescriptions filled in the ... Compiling OS: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS: Source branch: 0.17: Algorithm: SHA-256: Block type: Proof-of-Work: Coin name: Bitcoinrand: Coin abbreviation: BZAR: Address letter: R ...

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Plataforma de Futuros da Binance Passo a Passo -Como Operar Contratos Futuros de Bitcoin na Binance.

95% of Bitcoin exchange trading volume on CoinMarketCap.com is fake! So we decided to find out why and talked to the TIE’s co-founder Joshua Frank and Binance’s CZ to get to the truth. No vídeo de hoje vamos analisar a plataforma de futuros da binance e analisar passo a passo como operar os contratos futuros do bitcoin na binance com tranquilidade. Para quem não sabe contratos ... #Binance Expands Fiat Onramps, 15 New Currencies Now Support #Bitcoin, #Ethereum, #XRP Purchases Narrated by The Cryptocurrency Portal on Mon. Feb. 17th, 202... #Binance Reveals Visa Debit Card in Push to Bring #Bitcoin (BTC) and #Crypto Payments Worldwide Narrated by The Cryptocurrency Portal on Sat. March 28th, 2020 👌If you like this content, please ... “Nei prossimi anni avverrà un enorme trasferimento di ricchezza tra chi è rimasto fuori da Bitcoin e chi invece ne ha capito le potenzialità” Queste sono parole di Christian Miccoli, ex CEO ... Binance Acquires CoinMarketCap for $400 million! Crypto World Rocked! Is this a sign of things to come in the space? Narrated by The Cryptocurrency Portal on Thursday April 2nd, 2020 If you like ... Hey Krypto Fans,willkommen zur Bitcoin-Informant Show Nr. 572 Heute geht's um folgende Themen: Binance vor dem Kollaps, Thailand ICO Portal & Wachstum von Bitcoin schlecht für das Bankensystem ...

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